Wednesday, 1 March 2017

Web Magazine - February & March Issues - Rector's Pages


The Rector’s pages:  

Whilst looking for something to write for Lent I came across this short piece by Max Lucado.....

The Cross. Can you turn any direction without seeing one? Perched a top a church. Carved into a graveyard headstone. Engraved in a ring or suspended on a chain. The cross is the universal symbol of Christianity. An odd choice, don’t you think? Strange that a tool of torture would come to embody a movement of hope. The symbols of other faiths are more upbeat: the six-pointed star of David, the crescent moon of Islam, a lotus blossom for Buddhism. Yet a cross for Christianity? An instrument of execution?
Would you wear a tiny electric chair around your neck? Suspend a gold-plated hangman’s noose on the wall? Would you print a picture of a firing squad on a business card? Yet we do so with the cross. Many even make the sign of the cross as they pray. Would we make the sign of, say, a guillotine? Instead of the triangular touch on the forehead and shoulders, how about a karate chop on the palm? Doesn’t quite have the same feel, does it? Why is the cross the symbol of our faith?   To find the answer look no farther than the cross itself. Its design couldn’t be simpler. One beam horizontal - the other vertical. One reaches out like God's love; the other reaches up, as does God’s holiness. One represents the width of his love; the other reflects the height of his holiness. The cross is the intersection. The cross is where God forgave his children, where earth and heaven, God and Humanity, meet.                              How could he do this? God drew all to himself by the pain and suffering of the Cross; he took evil and transformed it, by service; he took pain and transformed it, by strength; he took defeat and transformed it by love. “God put on him the wrong, who never did any wrong, so we could be put right with God” (2 Cor. 5:21 MSG)
“Grant O Lord, that in your wounds I may find my safety, in your striped back my cure, in your pain my peace, in your Cross my victory, in your Resurrection my triumph, and in your thorned crown the glory of Heaven.  Amen.”

First Sunday Services - Sunday 2nd April 2017
Barrington - 6.00pm Evensong (NB 6.00pm!)
Cudworth - 11.15am Modern Communion
Dowlish Wake - 08.45am 1662 Communion 
Kingstone - 10.00am Family Service
Shepton Beauchamp - 10.30am Modern Communion


OTHER SERVICES

1st March - Ash Wednesday - The start of Lent
10.30am   Kingstone - Prayers & Communion
11.30am   Barrington - Prayers & Communion
6.30pm   Shepton - Prayers & Communion
(Each service lasts 30 minutes)

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World Day of Prayer - The people of the Philippines
The World Day of Prayer 2017 is Fri 3rd March, 
BUT 
rather than have a small service on this day, we are going to try something different to try and get the message to more people.   
All services on Sunday 5th March 
will have readings and prayers on this subject and Rev’d D’ has done a little booklet for everyone to take away with them.

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Buttle Close Common Room - Shepton Beauchamp
We meet at 11.30am on the first Thursday of each month in the Common Room of Buttle Close for a short, gentle service of prayers, hymns, readings and a story.   Everyone is very welcome.

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Weekday Communions
Shepton on Tuesdays at 10.30am.
These services are 30 minutes long, simple Communion Services to reflect, pray and give thanks.

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Dates for your Diary

Wed 1st March - Ash Wednesday - Barrington
12.10pm Lent Lunch in church

Sat 11th March - Barrington
Soup Kitchen at Village Hall 
(for Barrington Day Church Festival) flower fund





Your Village Church 
- your chance to have a say in its running or to ask questions - 
Annual General Meetings:

Will be held on the following dates
Tue 21st March - KINGSTONE - 7.00pm at Warden’s Lodge
Wed 27th March - CUDWORTH - 7.00pm in Church
Mon 3rd April - DOWLISH WAKE - 7.00pm in Church
Tue 4th April - PUCKINGTON - 7.30pm at Madge’s house next to Church
Wed 5th April - SHEPTON BEAUCHAMP - 7.00pm in Church
Wed 19th April - STOCKLINCH - 4.00pm at Manning’s Bungalow 
Wed 19th April - CHILLINGTON - 7.30pm in Church
Mon 24th April - BARRINGTON - 7.00pm in Church





From the Church Registers
10th February   Valerie Brierley, 96 yrs; funeral service at Cudworth.
10th February   Paul Vavasour, 88 yrs; burial at Shepton Beauchamp with his late wife Pauline, after a Catholic funeral service.

From other sources
20 Jan 17     Michael Welch, 69 yrs; born, raised and long time resident of Barrington, cremation at Taunton.




A Christian school teacher asked her class to look at TV adverts and see if they could use them to communicate ideas about God.

Here are some of the results:
God is like…. COKE …..He's the real thing.
God is like…..TIDE…..He gets the stains out others leave behind.
God is like…..WAL-MART…..He has everything. 
God is like…..ALKA-SELTZER…..Try Him, you'll like Him 
God is like…..SCOTCH TAPE…..You can't see Him, but you know He's there.
God is like…..VO-5 HAIR SPRAY…..He holds through all kinds of weather.
God is like…..MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE..…Good to the very last drop.
God is like…..The ENERGIZER BUNNY…..He Keeps going and going and going.



AGE UK  -    What is befriending?         ‘Loneliness’

   It is a very sad fact that many people are very lonely in our society today – many more than you may think.  Some people can go for days, weeks, even months without having a good conversation, friendship or a simple human touch like a pat on the back.  Illness can make it near impossible for some people to leave their home; which can make things worse. This js not just happening in towns but can also effect those who live in the countryside. Normally in a village such does not happen, I have seen first hand that it can.
   It not always age related either! Many middle aged and young people can feel very lonely.  As a priest I am well aware that a few kind words, a handshake, or just showing some interest in a person, can be so important. Indeed a  local church can be a great way to have interaction with other people or the vicar or others who be asked to visit.  You must be willing to help yourself!
   Age UK are a national Charity that offers many services for older people who find life difficult in different ways. Look on their website. They offer a ‘befriending service’ either by telephone or a personal visit. A volunteer with no agenda – will visit you at home for a chat. It’s as simple at that or via a phone call.  It has been a great success.

What is befriending?
Age UK offers different types of befriending services:
Face-to-face befriending, where a volunteer befriender visits an older person in their home
Telephone befriending, where a volunteer befriender will phone an older person

With both types of befriending each older person is assigned a befriender, who provides friendly conversation and companionship on a regular basis over a long period of time. Befriending provides an older person with a link to the outside world and often acts as a gateway for other services and valuable support. Perhaps you could volunteer to be a befriender?

Call Age UK Advice free on: 0800 678 1174   There is no shame in feeling lonely or asking for support.  For a healthy and happy life it’s a simple fact that most of us need some form of interaction with other people. We are not meant to be solitary beings for the most.  So don’t suffer alone – take the first step! You are welcome to phone or email me about such issues in confidence. My details are:
       
       Rev’d Tim Cook       Timcook9@icloud.com       01935-706042



First Sunday Services - Sunday 5th March 2017
Barrington - 5.30pm Evensong (5.30pm!)
Cudworth - 11.15am Modern Communion
Dowlish Wake - 08.45am 1662 Communion 
Kingstone - 10.00am Family Service
Shepton Beauchamp - 10.30am Modern Communion


OTHER SERVICES

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World Day of Prayer - early March
Watch this space for news of the new style, annual World Day of Prayer wherein, this year, we pray for the people of the Philippines.

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Buttle Close Common Room - Shepton Beauchamp
We meet at 11.30am on the first Thursday of each month in the Common Room of Buttle Close for a short, gentle service of prayers, hymns, readings and a story.   Everyone is very welcome.
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Weekday Communions
Shepton on Tuesdays at 10.30am.
These services are 30 minutes long, simple Communion Services to reflect, pray and give thanks.

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From the Church Registers
14 December 2016  Liz Jacobs from Seavington; ashes interred with her family at Shepton Beauchamp.
14 January 2017      Millie & Freddie Longman; holy baptism at Shepton Beauchamp.



Genuine Children’s Exam Answers!

Science:   Helicopters are cleverer than planes.  Not only can they fly through the air that can also hoover.
History:   Then Joan of Ark met her end.  She was burned as a steak.
Natural History:   Crabs and creatures like them all belong to a family of crushed asians.
Geography:   In geography we learned that countries with sea around them are islands and ones without sea are incontinents.
RE:   If you marry two people you are a pigamist, but morons are allowed to do this.
Geography:   In Scandinavia, the Danish people come from Denmark, the Norwegians come from Norway and the Lapdancers come from Lapland.















Friday, 30 December 2016

Web Magazine - DEC 16 & JAN 17 Issues - Rector's Pages


January 2017 - Happy New Year

The Rector’s pages:  
   Christmas is nearly over, but before we turn to our new year resolutions, lets just take a quick look back at the nativity scene, in particular at two critical characters yet two who stood quietly in the shadows of the story; the Innkeeper and Joseph.
   The Innkeeper, often portrayed as grumpy and bad-tempered who say the exhausted Joseph and the heavily pregnant Mary, but who couldn’t find room for them in the Inn……
The Tale of the Innkeeper (by R May Hill)
I am old, so old and weary – my eyes are growing dim
Yet I dream of the fateful evening when I had no room for Him.
The earth was hushed, expectant and a burning star hung low
For the Son of God’s arrival but how was I to know?
When Joseph came a-knocking shabby and poor
And Mary’s eye pleading, still I closed the door.
If the angels had carried the message, if the heavenly host had said,
‘The Kingly child is coming,’ I would have found a bed
When I heard the angelic chorus and saw the shepherds who came
Gladly to kneel and worship; sick was my heart with shame;
I am old, so old and weary and this is my earnest plea
That the loving Christ of Christmas will find a place for me.

Then Joseph, of whom we hear so little, raising another’s child as his own…..

Joseph's Lullaby (by Ron Klug)
Sleep now, little one. 
I will watch while you and your mother sleep.
I wish I could do more.
This straw is not good enough for you.
Back in Nazareth I'll make a proper bed for you
of seasoned wood, smooth, strong, well‑pegged.
A bed fit for a carpenter's son.
Just wait till we get back to Nazareth. 
I'll teach you everything I know.
You'll learn to choose the cedarwood, eucalyptus, and fir.
You'll learn to use the drawshave, ax, and saw.
Your arms will grow strong, your hands rough ‑‑ like these.
You will bear the pungent smell of new wood
and wear shavings and sawdust in your hair.
You'll be a man whose life centres 
on hammer and nails and wood.
But for now, sleep, little Jesus, sleep.

A happy, healthy and peace-filled New Year to you all.




First Sunday Services - Sunday 5th February 2017
Barrington - 5.30pm Evensong (5.30pm!)
Cudworth - 11.15am Modern Communion
Dowlish Wake - 08.45am 1662 Communion 
Kingstone - 10.00am Family Service
Shepton Beauchamp - 10.30am Modern Communion


OTHER SERVICES

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5th Sunday - 29th January 2017
10.30am    Family Communion at Puckington
5.00pm   A Candle-light Service at the darkest time of the year
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Buttle Close Common Room - Shepton Beauchamp
We meet at 11.30am on the first Thursday of each month in the Common Room of Buttle Close for a short, gentle service of prayers, hymns, readings and a story.   Everyone is very welcome.
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Weekday Communions
Shepton on Tuesdays at 10.30am.
These services are 30 minutes long, simple Communion Services to reflect, pray and give thanks.
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From the Church Registers
12 December   Judy Gummer; ashes interred with her family at Dowlish Wake.




GOD IS MY HOPE…

At my lowest…..God is my HOPE.
At my darkest…..God is my LIGHT.
At my weakest…..God is my STRENGTH.
At my saddest…..God is my COMFORT.



Genuine Children’s Exam Answers!

History: In wartime children who lived in big cities had to be evaporated because it was safer in the country.
Maths: The total is when you add up all the numbers and a remainder is an animal that pulls santa on his slay.
History: Sometimes in the war they take prisners and keep them as ostriges until the war is over.   Some prisners end up in consterpation camps.
(my computer’s spell-checker has just had a nervous breakdown!)
RE: A mosque is a sort of church.   The main difference is that its roof is doomed.
And: I asked my mum why we said old men at the end of prayers at school, I don’t know any old men apart from grandpa.
Holidays: on our activity holiday Dad wanted to ride the hores, but mum said they were too ekspensiv.
Maths: I would like to be an accountant but you have to know a lot about moths.
Geography: The closest town to France is Dover.   You can get to France on a train or you can go on a fairy.
Maths: If it is less than 90 degrees it is a cute angel.
The Arts: …and at the end of the show we all sing away in a manager.
And: In last year’s Christmas concert, Linzi played the main prat.   I played one of the smaller prats and I would like to have a bigger prat this year.







December 2016

The Rector’s pages:   A Teacher’s Christmas Story

Christmas is for love.  It is for joy, for giving and sharing, for laughter, for reuniting with family and friends, for tinsel and brightly covered packages.  But, mostly Christmas is for love. Matthew was a 10 year old orphan who lived with his aunt, a bitter, middle aged woman greatly annoyed with the burden of caring for her dead sister's son.  She never failed to remind young Matthew, if it hadn't been for her generosity, he would be a vagrant, homeless waif.  Still, with all the scolding and chilliness at home, he was a sweet and gentle child.

I had not noticed Matthew particularly until he began staying after class each day [at the risk of arousing his aunt's anger so I learned later] to help me straighten up the room.  We did this quietly and comfortably, not speaking much, but enjoying the solitude of that hour of the day.  When we did talk, Matthew spoke mostly of his mother.  Though he was quite young when she died, he remembered a kind, gentle, loving woman who always spent time with him.

As Christmas drew near however, Matthew failed to stay after school each day.  I looked forward to his coming, and when the days passed and he continued to scamper hurriedly from the room after class, I stopped him one afternoon and asked him why he no longer helped me in the room.  I told him how I had missed him, and his large brown eyes lit up eagerly as he replied, 'Did you really miss me?’   I explained how he had been my best helper, 'I was making you a surprise,' he whispered confidentially.  'It's for Christmas.' With that, he became embarrassed and dashed from the room. 

Finally came the last school day before Christmas.  Matthew crept slowly into the room late that afternoon with his hands concealing something behind his back.  'I have your present,' he said timidly when I looked up.  'I hope you like it.'  He held out his hands, and there lying in his small palms was a tiny wooden box.   'It's beautiful, Matthew.  Is there something in it?' I asked opening the top to look inside.  'Oh you can't see what's in it,' he replied, 'and you can't touch it, or taste it or feel it, but mother always said it makes you feel good all the time, warm on cold nights and safe when you're all alone.'
I gazed into the empty box.  'What is it, Matthew' I asked gently, 'that will make me feel so good?’   'It's love,' he whispered softly, 'and mother always said it's best when you give it away.' He turned and quietly left the room.

So now I keep a small box crudely made of scraps of wood on the piano in my living room and only smile when inquiring friends raise quizzical eyebrows when I explain to them there is love in it.   Yes, Christmas is for gaiety, mirth, song, and for good and wondrous gifts.  But mostly, Christmas is for love.

First Sunday Services - Sunday 1st January 2017
10.30 - 11.00am
Short, said, Communions at 
Dowlish Wake & Shepton Beauchamp




OTHER SERVICES

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CHRISTINGLE SERVICES
With Christmas fast approaching we have some CHRISTINGLE SERVICES coming up which may be of interest to 
people of all ages, from the very young to the very old.
The idea behind the service is to think about what Christmas means before we are all dragged into the chaos of the 21st century season; putting Christ back into Christmas.
Sunday 4th December - 10.00am at Kingstone
Sunday 18th December - 10.00am at Barrington

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Special Christmas Services - See centre pages of this magazine

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Buttle Close Common Room - Shepton Beauchamp
We meet at 11.30am on the first Thursday of each month in the Common Room of Buttle Close for a short, gentle service of prayers, hymns, readings and a story.   Everyone is very welcome.
+++++

Weekday Communions
Shepton on Tuesdays at 10.30am.
These services are 30 minutes long, simple Communion Services to reflect, pray and give thanks.
+++++






From the Church Registers
03 Nov 16 Tony Rice, 75 years; funeral service at Ilminster followed by burial at Moolham.
02 Nov 16 Philip Gibbons, 87 years; funeral service at Yeovil crematorium.
05 Nov 16 Stirling Winter; holy baptism at Barrington.
10 Nov 16 Dudley Taylor 96 years; cremation at Yeovil, followed by a thanksgiving service at Barrington church.
12 Nov 16 Clara Lerner; holy baptism at Chillington.

From other sources
15 Nov 15 Grace Trevvett, 93 years, a much loved and long time resident of Stocklinch; funeral service at Barham crematorium. 



Fund-raising thank you….
A very big thank you to all those folk involved in the following fund-raising events, for your time, handwork, cheerfulness and/or support……

Chillington “Fun & Games” evening - raise £688 towards the roof and wall repairs; very well done everyone!

Thank you to you all for your support.